Which 3D Printing Innovations were announced at CES 2019?

On the 8th of January, the annual Consumer Electronic Show (CES) kicked off in Las Vegas. It gathered, as usual, thousands of people intrigued about the business of consumer technologies. The show has an essential role in providing a platform for innovators and breakthrough technologies. For the last 50 years, many innovators have used this global stage to introduce their products to the market place. In fact, the event touches all sectors of new technologies including smart cities, sustainability, self-driving cars, cryptocurrencies, robotics, drones, artificial intelligence, gaming, and also 3D printing! This year, 79 exhibitors for additive manufacturing were present at CES 2019; larger companies were involved but also many startups. On the 11th at night, CES 2019 will end. Therefore, it’s time to recap which 3D printing innovations were announced in the last 3 days. Read the rest of the article here

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3D Printing Joint Ventures Needed For Many Suppliers

That scenario has changed in the past few years, particularly with the avalanche of inexpensive but highly capable desktop 3D printers emerging from manufacturers such as LulzBot, Prusa, AirWolf 3D, Raise 3D and many others. Some vendors have also pursued – and achieved – the development of higher temperature 3D printers. 

These machines were not only widely used, but are also capable of 3D printing in a much wider range of materials. 

But where are these materials coming from? 

The traditional approach of simply using materials from existing product catalogs has continued, but sometimes it’s discovered that a particular material may not provide the best 3D printing performance or quality, in spite of the material’s otherwise excellent and desirable engineering properties. 

What to do? 

The answer is to tune both the materials and the target 3D printer to print the material more optimally. 

But there’s a problem: while the 3D printer manufacturers are perfectly capable of tuning their device, they may not have the appropriate chemical knowledge and facilities to tune the materials. 

By the same logic, a materials company can tune the chemistry, but is less able to tune the machine that material is targeted to print on. 

Thus the need for partnerships: materials companies should reach out to 3D printer manufacturers and vice versa to create joint ventures intended to develop new materials that will be highly successful. 

One great example of such a partnership is the work undertaken by E3D Online, makers of what seems to be  current industry standard hot ends and extruders, and Victrex. These UK-based operations teamed up to develop a new “printable” PAEK polymer. They explain the problem: 

read the full article here

3D Printing Joint Ventures Needed For Many Suppliers

That scenario has changed in the past few years, particularly with the avalanche of inexpensive but highly capable desktop 3D printers emerging from manufacturers such as LulzBot, Prusa, AirWolf 3D, Raise 3D and many others. Some vendors have also pursued – and achieved – the development of higher temperature 3D printers. 

These machines were not only widely used, but are also capable of 3D printing in a much wider range of materials. 

But where are these materials coming from? 

The traditional approach of simply using materials from existing product catalogs has continued, but sometimes it’s discovered that a particular material may not provide the best 3D printing performance or quality, in spite of the material’s otherwise excellent and desirable engineering properties. 

What to do? 

The answer is to tune both the materials and the target 3D printer to print the material more optimally. 

But there’s a problem: while the 3D printer manufacturers are perfectly capable of tuning their device, they may not have the appropriate chemical knowledge and facilities to tune the materials. 

By the same logic, a materials company can tune the chemistry, but is less able to tune the machine that material is targeted to print on. 

Thus the need for partnerships: materials companies should reach out to 3D printer manufacturers and vice versa to create joint ventures intended to develop new materials that will be highly successful. 

One great example of such a partnership is the work undertaken by E3D Online, makers of what seems to be  current industry standard hot ends and extruders, and Victrex. These UK-based operations teamed up to develop a new “printable” PAEK polymer. They explain the problem: 

read the full article here

Which 3D Printing Innovations were announced at CES 2019?

On the 8th of January, the annual Consumer Electronic Show (CES) kicked off in Las Vegas. It gathered, as usual, thousands of people intrigued about the business of consumer technologies. The show has an essential role in providing a platform for innovators and breakthrough technologies. For the last 50 years, many innovators have used this global stage to introduce their products to the market place. In fact, the event touches all sectors of new technologies including smart cities, sustainability, self-driving cars, cryptocurrencies, robotics, drones, artificial intelligence, gaming, and also 3D printing! This year, 79 exhibitors for additive manufacturing were present at CES 2019; larger companies were involved but also many startups. On the 11th at night, CES 2019 will end. Therefore, it’s time to recap which 3D printing innovations were announced in the last 3 days. Read the rest of the article here

3D Printing Trends For The Next 5 years

The North American regional market dominated the global 3D printing industry in terms of revenue in 2016, accounting for the maximum market share. The growth may be attributed to the increasing technological advancements and the region’s economic potential to invest in emerging technologies. The U.S. and Canada are some of the prominent and early adopters of emerging technologies across various manufacturing practices. These factors offer lucrative opportunities for 3D printing in different applications in the North American region.

Europe being the largest region in the world consists of several industry players operating actively in the additive manufacturing industry. The region has a strong hands-on technical expertise and an absolute know-how of additive manufacturing, which has made it the second-largest market. 

On the other hand, the Asia Pacific region is anticipated to witness a remarkable growth in the 3DP market. The region is anticipated to register a CAGR of 20.4% from 2017 to 2025. The regional countries such as Japan, China, and South Korea are expected to emerge as the promising adopters of the additive manufacturing over the forecast period in the manufacturing practices in the various industry verticals.

Read the entire article here

3D Printing Joint Ventures Needed For Many Suppliers

That scenario has changed in the past few years, particularly with the avalanche of inexpensive but highly capable desktop 3D printers emerging from manufacturers such as LulzBot, Prusa, AirWolf 3D, Raise 3D and many others. Some vendors have also pursued – and achieved – the development of higher temperature 3D printers. 

These machines were not only widely used, but are also capable of 3D printing in a much wider range of materials. 

But where are these materials coming from? 

The traditional approach of simply using materials from existing product catalogs has continued, but sometimes it’s discovered that a particular material may not provide the best 3D printing performance or quality, in spite of the material’s otherwise excellent and desirable engineering properties. 

What to do? 

The answer is to tune both the materials and the target 3D printer to print the material more optimally. 

But there’s a problem: while the 3D printer manufacturers are perfectly capable of tuning their device, they may not have the appropriate chemical knowledge and facilities to tune the materials. 

By the same logic, a materials company can tune the chemistry, but is less able to tune the machine that material is targeted to print on. 

Thus the need for partnerships: materials companies should reach out to 3D printer manufacturers and vice versa to create joint ventures intended to develop new materials that will be highly successful. 

One great example of such a partnership is the work undertaken by E3D Online, makers of what seems to be  current industry standard hot ends and extruders, and Victrex. These UK-based operations teamed up to develop a new “printable” PAEK polymer. They explain the problem: 

read the full article here

3D Printing Trends For The Next 5 years

The North American regional market dominated the global 3D printing industry in terms of revenue in 2016, accounting for the maximum market share. The growth may be attributed to the increasing technological advancements and the region’s economic potential to invest in emerging technologies. The U.S. and Canada are some of the prominent and early adopters of emerging technologies across various manufacturing practices. These factors offer lucrative opportunities for 3D printing in different applications in the North American region.

Europe being the largest region in the world consists of several industry players operating actively in the additive manufacturing industry. The region has a strong hands-on technical expertise and an absolute know-how of additive manufacturing, which has made it the second-largest market. 

On the other hand, the Asia Pacific region is anticipated to witness a remarkable growth in the 3DP market. The region is anticipated to register a CAGR of 20.4% from 2017 to 2025. The regional countries such as Japan, China, and South Korea are expected to emerge as the promising adopters of the additive manufacturing over the forecast period in the manufacturing practices in the various industry verticals.

Read the entire article here

3D Printing Joint Ventures Needed For Many Suppliers

That scenario has changed in the past few years, particularly with the avalanche of inexpensive but highly capable desktop 3D printers emerging from manufacturers such as LulzBot, Prusa, AirWolf 3D, Raise 3D and many others. Some vendors have also pursued – and achieved – the development of higher temperature 3D printers. 

These machines were not only widely used, but are also capable of 3D printing in a much wider range of materials. 

But where are these materials coming from? 

The traditional approach of simply using materials from existing product catalogs has continued, but sometimes it’s discovered that a particular material may not provide the best 3D printing performance or quality, in spite of the material’s otherwise excellent and desirable engineering properties. 

What to do? 

The answer is to tune both the materials and the target 3D printer to print the material more optimally. 

But there’s a problem: while the 3D printer manufacturers are perfectly capable of tuning their device, they may not have the appropriate chemical knowledge and facilities to tune the materials. 

By the same logic, a materials company can tune the chemistry, but is less able to tune the machine that material is targeted to print on. 

Thus the need for partnerships: materials companies should reach out to 3D printer manufacturers and vice versa to create joint ventures intended to develop new materials that will be highly successful. 

One great example of such a partnership is the work undertaken by E3D Online, makers of what seems to be  current industry standard hot ends and extruders, and Victrex. These UK-based operations teamed up to develop a new “printable” PAEK polymer. They explain the problem: 

read the full article here

3D Printing Trends For The Next 5 years

The North American regional market dominated the global 3D printing industry in terms of revenue in 2016, accounting for the maximum market share. The growth may be attributed to the increasing technological advancements and the region’s economic potential to invest in emerging technologies. The U.S. and Canada are some of the prominent and early adopters of emerging technologies across various manufacturing practices. These factors offer lucrative opportunities for 3D printing in different applications in the North American region.

Europe being the largest region in the world consists of several industry players operating actively in the additive manufacturing industry. The region has a strong hands-on technical expertise and an absolute know-how of additive manufacturing, which has made it the second-largest market. 

On the other hand, the Asia Pacific region is anticipated to witness a remarkable growth in the 3DP market. The region is anticipated to register a CAGR of 20.4% from 2017 to 2025. The regional countries such as Japan, China, and South Korea are expected to emerge as the promising adopters of the additive manufacturing over the forecast period in the manufacturing practices in the various industry verticals.

Read the entire article here